The Relationship between Boundary Work Tactics and Work-Family Conflict among Working Women

  • Nur Fatihah Abdullah Bandar Faculty of Cognitive Sciences and Human Development, UNIMAS
  • Mila Tay Faculty of Cognitive Sciences and Human Development, UNIMAS
  • Dayang Kartini Abg Ibrahim Faculty of Cognitive Sciences and Human Development, UNIMAS
  • Zaiton Hassan Faculty of Cognitive Sciences and Human Development, UNIMAS
Keywords: Boundary work tactics, work-family conflict

Abstract

This study aims to identify the relationship between boundary work tactics (behavioral, temporal, physical and communicative) and work-family conflict among working women. A survey methodology was used in this study. This research involves the utilisation of questionnaire which was administered among one-hundred and three (103) working women currently working in a selected organisation. This study was conducted in a selected private organisation in Kuching, Sarawak. The relationship between boundary work tactics and work-family conflicts was analyzed using the Pearson’s correlation analysis test. The results of this study revealed that there is a significant relationship between behavioral tactics, temporal tactics, and communicative tactics with work-family conflict. Hence, from this study, the organisation can implement more strategic tactics to reduce work-family conflicts when the working women are challenged to balance responsibilities between their work and family.

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Published
2016-09-01
How to Cite
Bandar, N. F. A., Tay, M., Ibrahim, D. K. A., & Hassan, Z. (2016). The Relationship between Boundary Work Tactics and Work-Family Conflict among Working Women. Journal of Cognitive Sciences and Human Development, 2(1), 1-12. https://doi.org/10.33736/jcshd.357.2016